(4) New and Potential PCa Breakthrough Articles!

Hi Guys,

(4) excellent articles on new and potential PCa breakthroughs.  Article #1 is very important as Abiraterone (Zytiga) has been use with good success.  Now they are finding that Zytiga might provide an additional mechanism of action in blocking tumour growth.   Article#2 reports a virus that targets and kills all types of prostate cancer cells and leaves normal cells untouched!  Article #4 offers (2) Guidance Statements on appraisal of available guidelines on screening for prostate cancer. from “Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians”.

1)  In Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer, Study Shows Additional Role For Abiraterone In Blocking Tumor Growth   (Article Date: 18 Mar 2013)       “As part of an EU-supported IMI-PREDECT consortium, a Dutch study showed that anti-androgenic properties of the drug abiraterone may provide an additional mechanism of action in blocking tumour growth of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).  Our results show that high concentrations of androgen precursors can drive CRPC growth through direct activation of (overexpressed) AR and not necessarily via the result of (intratumoural) CYP17-metabolism. This suggests that CRPC may not rely solely on de novo androgen synthesis, said lead author Dr. Jan Matthijs Moll of the Erasmus Medical Center, Dept. of Urology in Rotterdam, Netherlands”.

Full Story

2)  Virus That Kills Prostate Cancer Cells Shows Treatment Potential  (Article Date: 26 Feb 2013)    “A modified Newcastle disease virus that targets and kills all types of prostate cancer cells and leaves normal cells untouched shows promise as a cancer treatment that avoids the side effects which normally accompany hormonal treatment and chemotherapies, says a team of veterinary scientists in the US”.

Full Story 2

3) Landmark Study Shows Loss Of E-Cadherin Drives Prostate Cancer Progression And How To Restart Production  (Article Date: 04 Apr 2013)   Prostate cancer doesn’t kill in the prostate – it’s only once the disease travels to bone, lung, liver, etc. that it turns fatal. Previous studies have shown that loss of the protein E-Cadherin is essential for this metastasis. A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry describes for the first time a switch that regulates the production of E-Cadherin: the transcription factor SPDEF turns on and off production, leading to metastasis or stopping it cold in models of prostate cancer”.

Full Story 3

4)  Article From:  ” American College of Physicians” (ACP) Guidance Statement

Guidance Statement 1: Guidance Statement 1: ACP recommends that clinicians inform men between the age of 50 and 69 years about the limited potential benefits and substantial harms of screening for prostate cancer.   ACP recommends that clinicians base the decision to screen for prostate cancer using the prostate specific antigen test on the risk for prostate cancer, a discussion of the benefits and harms of screening, the patient’s general health and life expectancy, and patient preferences. ACP recommends that clinicians should not screen for prostate cancer using the prostate-specific antigen test in patients who do not express a clear preference for screening.

 

Guidance Statement 2: Guidance Statement 2: ACP recommends that clinicians should not screen for prostate cancer using the prostate-specific antigen test in average-risk men under the age of 50 years, men over the age of 69 years, or men with a life expectancy of less than 10 to 15 years.

LIFE ISN’T ABOUT WAITING FOR THE STORM TO PASS……..
IT’S LEARNING HOW TO DANCE IN THE RAIN

Craig Becker

The New Denver Men’s Club

 University Prostate Cancer Support Group, Inc.
Group Leader

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s